Source: The Mercury, Saturday, July 29, 1995, p.3


Aussies going
cold on the
easy greasies

AUSTRALIANS are eating 
less take-away fast food 
opting for healthier salads 
yoghurts and foccacia 
instead, new research shows. 
 
   The fast food industry 
which has recorded double- 
digit annual growth for more 
than a decade, is feeling the 
effects as its rate of growth 
slows. 
 
   The trend is forcing small 
takeaway outlets to make a 
shift away from fried foods 
towards healthier foods, and 
to reinvent themselves as 
gourmet sandwich bars, for 
instance, to survive. 
 
   The research was contained 
in a new study, Fast Food in 
Australia 1995-1997, 
prepared by global marketing 
intelligence and forecasting 
group BIS Shrapnel. 
 
   The national study is due to 
be released formally in 
October. 
 
   An ageing population and 
greater health consciousness 
 
were the main reasons salad 
sandwiches and yoghurt were 
replacing hamburgers chips 
and pies on the national diet, 
researchers found. 
 
   Dr Sandro Mangosi, a 
senior consultant and 
specialist in the Australian 
food market with BIS 
Shrapnel, says Australians' 
eating habits have continued 
to change over the past two 
years. 
 
   Doubts in consumers' 
minds about the nutritional 
value of fast food were 
apparent two years ago-a 
trend that has accelerated 
since, he said yesterday. 
 
   The flipside of the downturn 
in the fast-food industry is 
significant growth in the 
number of restaurants and 
cafes, according to the BIS 
Shrapnel research. 
 
   Dr Mangosi said fast-food 
industry growth averaged 
10.5 per cent between 1984 
and 1989 and 11 per cent 
between 1989 and 1993. 
 
   But as the 1990s 
continued, the trend towards 
healthier eating habits 
accelerated. 
 
   Research in 1993 showed 
that: "Although the current 
list of most popular meals- 
such as fried fish, hot chips, 
hamburgers, pizza and meat 
pies-is a nutritional 
nightmare, there are clear 
signs that consumers are 
changing their habits and 
moving towards healthier 
products. 
 
   "For instance, the demand 
for fruit, fruit juice, yoghurt 
and vegetable salads is in- 
creasing." 
 
    And although 70 per cent 
of the population still opted  
for quick, cheap fast food 
probably bought from a 
chain, the trend towards 
healthier food was becoming  
increasinglyapparent, he 
said. 
 


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