Source: The Mercury, 3 September 1993, p. 9


Distance
travelled
key to
vehicle
accidents


By CHARLES WATERHOUSE

THE chance of having a motor
vehicle accident does not de-
pend on your sex but how
many kilometres you travel, a
survey shows.

Tasmanian underwriting
manager of QBE Insurance
Ltd Graham Day said a study
of 1992 Tasmanian statistics
found the accident probability
rates for men and women were
almost the same despite a lar-
ger number of accidents in-
volving men being reported to
police.

This was because men
travelled about twice as many
kilometres a year as women
and slightly more men had
licences.

Mr Day based the kilometres
travelled in 1992 on estimates
supplied by 76 QBE men and
women policy holders rather
than applying them to the Tas-
manian population.

Men travelled between 8200
to 10,600 kilometres a year,
while women between 4700 to
6600 kilometres a year.

The estimated probability of
an accident in Tasmania for
men was one every 319,500
kilometres and for women one
every 318,500 kilometres.

Recently released statistics
from the New South Wales
Roads and Traffic Authority
showed women drivers were
three times less likely than
men to be involved in a fatal
collisions.

Officer in charge of traffic in
the eastern police district
Senior Sergeant Glen Woolley
said women were "very re-
sponsible drivers" and the
NSW statistics did not to sur-
prise him.

"I think females are more
likely to be involved in minor
accidents as opposed to more
serious accidents," he said.

Robin Eccles, a part owner
of Hobart's VIP Driving
School and a driving instruc-
tor for 20 years, said women
had come of age as drivers.

"The reason men have more
accidents is because they are
more mechanically minded
and they know the limits of
their vehicles and drive close
to those limits," he said.

"The wives don't drive to the
limit because they don't know
the car's limit."

Taxi Combined Services'
Linda Houston said: "I have
seen some fairly woeful female
drivers and some fairly woeful
male drivers.

"I think more men are driv-
ing on the road and therefore
are more likely to have acci-
dents.

"Men take more chances
and like to drive fast."


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